MFI Daily Data

MFI Daily Data Sample

Northern Institutional Funds filed to liquidate its $1.7 billion Northern Prime Obligations Portfolio earlier this week, we learned from Bloomberg. The filing says, "The Board of Trustees (the 'Board') of Northern Institutional Funds (the 'Trust') has determined, after consideration of a number of factors, that it is in the best interests of the Prime Obligations Portfolio (the 'Portfolio') and its shareholders that the Portfolio be liquidated and terminated on or about July 10, 2020 (the 'Liquidation Date') pursuant to a plan of liquidation approved by the Board. The Liquidation Date may be changed at the discretion of the Trust's officers. The pending liquidation of the Portfolio may be terminated and/or abandoned at any time before the Liquidation Date by action of the Board of the Trust. As of the date of this supplement, Williams Capital Shares of the Portfolio have not commenced operations and are not offered for purchase." (The fund's assets are down from $3.8 billion on Feb. 28, 2020.)

The Bloomberg piece, "Northern Trust to Shutter Money-Market Fund After Redemptions," tells us, "Northern Trust Corp. is shutting down a money-market mutual fund after volatility in March spurred redemptions that sent it below a regulatory threshold for maintaining liquidity. The $1.7 billion Northern Institutional Prime Obligations Portfolio will stop accepting new investments next month and start selling its holdings under a liquidation plan set for July 10, according to a filing."

Reuters, in a March 23 article,"Fed's Money Market Move Lifts Northern Trust Fund Above Key Threshhold," wrote, "Liquidity at a $2.2 billion prime money-market fund run by Northern Trust Corp fell below the key 30% U.S. regulatory threshold twice last week, but rebounded above that level after the U.S. Federal Reserve shored up the industry. As the coronavirus roils the global economy and squeezes Wall Street for cash, money-market reforms put in place after the 2007-2009 financial crisis are weathering a major test."

They explained, "Several institutional prime funds, whose investors include large corporations, were at risk of falling below the 30% threshold before the Fed took extraordinary steps reminiscent of the last financial crisis to backstop the money-market industry." The Northern Prime Obligations Portfolio disclosed that its weekly liquidity level fell to 27% of assets twice last week, according to the fund's website -- reducing its buffer for quickly converting assets into cash to meet investors' redemptions. However, Chicago-based Northern Trust, a bank and wealth manager, said on Monday the latest weekly liquidity level for the fund was nearly 41%."

In other news, The Federal Reserve Bank of New York published an update on the "The Primary Dealer Credit Facility" via its Liberty Street Economics blog. They write, "On March 17, 2020, the Federal Reserve announced that it would re-establish the Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF) to allow primary dealers to support smooth market functioning and facilitate the availability of credit to businesses and households. The PDCF started offering overnight and term funding with maturities of up to ninety days on March 20. It will be in place for at least six months and may be extended as conditions warrant. In this post, we provide an overview of the PDCF and its usage to date."

The NY Fed writes, "Lending rose quickly after the PDCF's launch, and the weekly average of outstanding loans peaked at over $35 billion for the week ending April 15.... Outstanding loans remained in the $30-35 billion range for a few weeks, before decreasing recently, as market conditions improved. The vast majority of value-weighted PDCF loans have a maturity longer than overnight.... The bulk of the assets financed in the PDCF to date have been corporate and municipal debt, as well as asset-backed securities and commercial paper. These are asset classes that were experiencing considerable volatility and pressure in early March. Market conditions have improved markedly since the introduction of a variety of Fed interventions, including the PDCF."

They explain, "The Federal Reserve initially established the PDCF in March of 2008, following severe strains in the tri-party repo market, associated in part with Bear Stearns' troubles.... Following its inception in March 2008, usage of the original PDCF increased to approximately $40 billion, before decreasing to zero by mid-2008.... This $40 billion level is roughly comparable to the peak usage of today's PDCF. Usage of the original PDCF increased to over $140 billion in September 2008, following the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers. This peak is much higher than the current use of today's PDCF. However, the range of collateral eligible for the PDCF post-Lehman was much broader than the range of eligible collateral at the PDCF today, making comparisons difficult."

The piece adds, "The PDCF is one of many facilities introduced by the Federal Reserve to support the U.S. economy in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. The PDCF helps primary dealers support smooth market functioning and facilitate the availability of credit to businesses and households in their capacity as market makers for corporate, consumer, and municipal obligations." For more, see these previous Liberty Street Economics blogs: "The Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility" and "The Commercial Paper Funding Facility."

Finally, Crane Data published its latest Weekly Money Fund Portfolio Holdings statistics Tuesday, which track a shifting subset of our monthly Portfolio Holdings collection. The most recent cut (with data as of May 15) includes Holdings information from 80 money funds (up two from two weeks ago), which represent $2.664 trillion (up from $2.568 trillion) of the $5.123 trillion (52.0%) in total money fund assets tracked by Crane Data. (Note that our Weekly MFPH are e-mail only and aren't available on the website. For our latest monthly Holdings, see our May 12 News, "May MF Portfolio Holdings: Treasuries Skyrocket, Repo Plunges in April.)

Our latest Weekly MFPH Composition summary again shows Government assets dominating the holdings list with Treasury totaling $1.344 trillion (up from $1.209 trillion two weeks ago), or 50.4%, Repurchase Agreements (Repo) totaling $635.7 billion (down from $706.4 billion two weeks ago), or 23.9% and Government Agency securities totaling $470.7 billion (up from $470.4 billion), or 17.7%. Certificates of Deposit (CDs) totaled $70.7 billion (up from $48.7 billion), or 2.7% and Commercial Paper (CP) totaled $59.2 billion (up from $58.7 billion), or 2.2%. A total of $46.9 billion or 1.8%, was listed in the Other category (primarily Time Deposits), and VRDNs accounted for $37.6 billion, or 1.4%.

The Ten Largest Issuers in our Weekly Holdings product include: the US Treasury with $1.344 trillion (50.4% of total holdings), Federal Home Loan Bank with $289.3B (10.9%), Fixed Income Clearing Co with $99.9B (3.7%), Federal Farm Credit Bank with $69.9B (2.6%), BNP Paribas with $69.5B (2.6%), Federal National Mortgage Association with $57.5B (2.2%), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp with $51.3B (1.9%), JP Morgan with $49.5B (1.9%), RBC with $46.8B (1.8%) and Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group Inc with $30.0B (1.1%).

The Ten Largest Funds tracked in our latest Weekly include: JP Morgan US Govt ($228.4B), Goldman Sachs FS Govt ($217.0B), Fidelity Inv MM: Govt Port ($194.3B), BlackRock Lq FedFund ($175.5B), JPMorgan 100% US Treas MMkt ($142.3B), Wells Fargo Govt MM ($138.6B), Goldman Sachs FS Treas Instruments ($133.3B), Morgan Stanley Inst Liq Govt ($109.3B), State Street Inst US Govt ($105.4B) and BlackRock Lq T-Fund ($86.4B). (Let us know if you'd like to see our latest domestic U.S. and/or "offshore" Weekly Portfolio Holdings collection and summary, or our Bond Fund Portfolio Holdings data series.)

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MFI Daily Data News

Feb 05
 

The February issue of our flagship Money Fund Intelligence newsletter, which was sent out to subscribers Friday morning, features the articles: "Covid Changing Cash; Social, ESG MMFs Making Impact," which reviews the latest in environmental, social and governance MMFs; "Money Fund University 2021: A Look at History, Instruments," which highlights quotes from our recent basic training webinar; and, "Fee Waivers Bite: $3.1 Billion & Counting; Revenue $6 Tril.," which explores pressures on MMF expense ratios. We also sent out our MFI XLS spreadsheet Friday a.m. (MFI, MFI XLS and our Crane Index products are all available to subscribers via our Content center.) Our February Money Fund Portfolio Holdings are scheduled to ship on Tuesday, February 9, and our February Bond Fund Intelligence is scheduled to go out Friday, February 12. (Note: A press release entitled, "SEC Requests Comment on Potential Money Market Fund Reform Options Highlighted in President's Working Group Report" was posted yesterday. Watch for full coverage next week.)

MFI's lead article says, "As we move into 2021 and prepare to re-emerge from the coronavirus era, the world of cash investing continues to adapt to the ever-changing rate and regulatory environment, and it continues to be confused over the push towards 'ESG' and 'Social' MMFs. We list the latest group of ESG funds on page 5 (we expect more soon), and we briefly review the latest in the space below."

"SSGA published 'Transformed Overnight: How COVID-19 Changed Cash,' which talks about several major themes in the money markets last year, including one of the biggest, ESG. SSGA's Will Goldthwait writes, in a section entitled, 'The Quest for Yield: Lower for Much Longer,' 'Entrenched low interest rates are prompting concern that the corporate treasury department will revert from profit center to cost center. While safety and liquidity remain top priorities, cash managers 'have never before kept such a sharp eye on yield across their providers,' observed one relationship manager. 'Every basis point matters now.'"

Our "MFU 2021" piece reads, "Crane Data recently hosted its annual 'basic training' event, Money Fund University, where speakers reviewed various segments and aspects of the money markets. But they also managed to sneak in some comments on current events. We briefly review and excerpt from some of the highlights below. (Note: Crane Data Subscribers and Money Fund University Attendees may access the MFU `Powerpoint and recordings via our 'Money Fund University 2021 Download Center.')"

It goes on, "During the 'History & Current State of Money Market Mutual Funds' introduction, our Peter Crane comments, "Money funds turned 50 years old in October ... so we're celebrating all year. It’s been a wonderful ride…. First let me give you some basics … Money funds are ... short-term bond funds, with quality, diversity, liquidity, and maturity guidelines around them. The stable $1.00 a share price was one of the key elements.... They use something called amortized cost, so the fluctuations were minimal, and they were always priced at $1.00.'"

Crane continues, "But, we've seen rounds of regulatory reforms, and the 2014 reforms that went into effect in 2016 allowed some money funds' NAVs to float.... So, the dollar feature of money funds is shifting somewhat from what it was historically.... Money funds were having a nice recovery, rates had been up over 2% again.... In 2019 and 2020, money fund assets grew by just under 20% each year.... You can see that super spike up from dash to cash coronavirus growth."

The "Fee Waivers" article tells readers, "Mutual fund news source ignites published the article, 'Sponsors Waived $3.1B in Money Fund Fees in 2020.' They write, 'Money market fund sponsors waived $3.1 billion in fees last year, according to Investment Company Institute data. An economic slowdown spurred by the coronavirus pandemic led the Federal Reserve to cut short-term interest rates twice last March, to zero, after about two years of keeping the benchmark rate above 1.5%. With those cuts, yields tumbled, and a growing number of money funds began waiving fees to avoid zero or negative yields.'"

Ignites explains, "As of December, 94% of all money fund share classes waived a portion of expenses, ICI data shows. That compares to 68% in January 2020.... The overall increase last year in money fund assets also pushed up the total amount of fees waived. Investors piled into money funds in March amid liquidity concerns, adding about $700 billion to the products that month, according to Crane Data."

The latest MFI also includes the News piece, "SEC Seeks Comments on Reforms." It says, "See the release, "SEC Requests Comment on Potential Money Market Fund Reform Options Highlighted in President's Working Group Report," and see our coverage inside on the PWG report." We also include the brief, "Money Fund Assets Flat in January," which explains, "ICI's weekly 'Money Market Fund Assets' report shows assets down in the latest week, after rising 3 out of 4 prior weeks. Crane Data shows assets up $5.6 billion to $4.730 trillion."

A third news brief entitled, "Federated Hermes Launches Conservative 'Microshort'," says, "The release, 'Federated Hermes, Inc. Launches Two New Microshort Funds,' tells us, 'Federated Hermes ... announced the launch of Federated Hermes Conservative Microshort Fund and Federated Hermes Conservative Municipal Microshort Fund. The actively managed funds offer an innovative approach to liquidity management by pursuing higher yields than money market strategies while simultaneously aiming to maintain lower NAV volatility by investing in securities with shorter maturities than traditional ultrashort products.'"

Our February MFI XLS, with January 31 data, shows total assets rose by $5.6 billion in January to $4.730 trillion, after decreasing $6.7 billion in December, $11.7 billion in November, $46.8 billion in October, $121.2 billion in September, $42.3 billion in August, $44.2 billion in July and $113.0 billion in June. Assets increased $31.6 billion in May, $417.9 billion in April and $688.1 billion in March. Our broad Crane Money Fund Average 7-Day Yield was unchanged at 0.02%, our Crane 100 Money Fund Index (the 100 largest taxable funds) also remained flat at 0.02%.

On a Gross Yield Basis (7-Day) (before expenses are taken out), both the Crane MFA and the Crane 100 sat at 0.15%. Charged Expenses averaged 0.13% for both the Crane MFA and Crane 100. (We'll revise expenses on Monday once we upload the SEC's Form N-MFP data for 1/31.) The average WAM (weighted average maturity) for the Crane MFA and Crane 100 was 42 (up a day) and 46 days (unch.) respectively. (See our Crane Index or craneindexes.xlsx history file for more on our averages.)

Jan 08
 

The January issue of our flagship Money Fund Intelligence newsletter, which was sent out to subscribers Friday morning, features the articles: "Highlights of '20: March Madness, Asset Surge, Rate Crash," which reviews one of the craziest years in money funds' 50-year history; "ICD Portal's Tory Hazard Keeps Focus on Clients, Tech," which profiles the leader of the largest independent MMF "portal"; and, "Top Money Funds of 2020; 12th Annual MFI Awards," which reviews the No. 1‐ranked funds based on 1‐year, 5‐year and 10‐year returns. We've also updated our Money Fund Wisdom database with December 31 statistics, and send out our MFI XLS spreadsheet Friday a.m. (MFI, MFI XLS and our Crane Index products are all available to subscribers via our Content center.) Our January Money Fund Portfolio Holdings are scheduled to ship on Tuesday, January 12, and our January Bond Fund Intelligence is scheduled to go out Friday, January 15.

MFI's lead article says, "Money fund assets jumped by 20% in 2020, the second year in a row, as yields plunged and businesses scrambled for cash in response to the coronavirus lockdown. Prime MMFs came under pressure and frozen money markets triggered Fed and Treasury assistance, while Government MMFs jumped by an eye-popping $1.1 trillion. Fee waivers and talk of further regulatory change became major topics, and trends toward social and ESG MMFs, and technology, continued from the prior year. Below, we take a look at the highlights of 2020, and also provide a brief outlook for 2021."

It continues, "Crane Data's numbers showed assets rose by $775.4 billion, or 19.6%, to end just over $4.7 trillion ($4.733T) in 2020. ICI's narrower asset collection settled at $4.297 trillion, up by $665 billion, or 18.3%.... After inching lower in 2019, yields plunged to zero in 2020. Our Crane 100 MF Index fell from 1.46% to 0.02%, while our broader Crane Money Fund Average fell from 1.32% to 0.02%.... Yields are expected to be flat in the New Year, though they could inch higher late in '21 if expectations for rising rates in 2022 or 2023 grow."

Our latest "Profile" piece reads, "This month, MFI interviews ICD CEO Tory Hazard. We ask him about San Francisco-based ICD's history in cash and discuss Prime funds, fee waiver pressures, current priorities, and ICD's outlook for the coming year. Hazard reminds us why money market funds are 'a valuable part of institutional investment portfolios in all yield environments,' and tells us that investors are 'looking for products that earn at least some yield.' Our Q&A follows."

MFI says, "Give us a little history. Hazard explains, "ICD has been solely focused on the treasury marketplace from day one. As an agnostic provider of money market funds and short-term investments for institutional investors, we bring institutional investors together with hundreds of investment products. ICD was founded by three money market fund sales executives over 17 years ago, in 2003. Prior to forming ICD, the founders were working for big banks and were relegated to offering only their respective banks’ funds, using primitive technology. They recognized the opportunity to create an independent marketplace of investment products that could be accessed through an investment portal. Their vision was to provide clients with the best products and services in the industry, and that remains our mission today."

Hazard continues, "I joined the company in 2009 and served as CFO, COO and President before becoming CEO in 2017. Coming in, my key focus was to continue scaling the business while extending the value of the firm's service and technology. We were the first portal company with operations in Europe. We were the first portal company to release a robust exposure analytics application. We led the portal industry in integrating treasury technologies, and we introduced the industry's first multi counterparty secure automated settlement solution. We'll be announcing more industry innovations in 2021. Today, we serve over 400 companies across 65 industries in 43 countries around the world."

The "12th Annual MFI Awards" article tells readers, "This issue recognizes the top performing money funds, ranked by total returns, for calendar year 2020, as well as the top funds for the past 5‐year and 10‐year periods. We present the funds below with our annual Money Fund Intelligence Awards. These are given to the No. 1‐ranked funds based on 1‐year, 5‐year and 10‐year returns, through Dec. 31, 2020, in each of our major fund categories -- Prime Institutional, Government Institutional, Treasury Institutional, Prime Retail, Government Retail, Treasury Retail and Tax‐Exempt."

The rankings begin, "The Top-Performing Prime Institutional fund (and fund overall) was BlackRock Cash Inst MMF SL (BRC01), which returned 0.94%, but Western Asset Prem Inst Liquid Res Capital (WAAXX) was first if restricted funds are excluded with a return of 0.69%. For Prime Retail funds, Wells Fargo MMF Prm (WMPXX) had the best return in 2020 (0.68%)."

The latest MFI also includes the News piece, "Assets Up Big in '20, But Flat in Dec.," which says, "Crane Data's MFI shows money fund assets down just $6.3 billion in December, but up by a huge $775.4 billion, or 19.6%, in 2020. ICI's weekly data series shows money fund assets up $665 billion, or 18.3%, in 2020, with Inst MMFs up $510 billion (22.5%) and Retail MMFs up $156 billion (11.4%). The gains in '20 almost match those of 2019, and are the biggest in dollar terms since 2008."

A second news brief entitled, "Northern Drops Other Prime Shoe, Exits Muni Too," explains, "Northern Funds, which exited the Prime Institutional money fund space earlier this year, filed to exit the Prime Retail and Municipal segments as well. The 11th largest money fund manager ($168.3 billion) holds 99.7% in Government assets. See the press release, 'Northern Trust Asset Management Announces Changes to Money Market Mutual Fund Suite.' Wells Fargo Funds also filed to merge its two Prime portfolios into one."

A third news brief, "Invesco Files for Cavu Securities Class" explains, "Invesco's Form N1-A registration for its Short-Term Investment Trust (STIT) says it will launch new 'CAVU Securities Classes' for Invesco Liquid Assets Portfolio, Invesco Treasury Portfolio and Invesco Government & Agency Portfolio. The filing says, 'This prospectus is to be used only by clients of CAVU Securities, LLC (CAVU). CAVU is a veteran and minority owned firm.'"

Our January MFI XLS, with December 31 data, shows total assets fell by $6.3 billion in December to $4.733 trillion, after decreasing $11.7 billion in November, $46.8 billion in October, $121.2 billion in September, $42.3 billion in August, $44.2 billion in July and $113.0 billion in June. Assets increased $31.6 billion in May, $417.9 billion in April and $688.1 billion in March. Our broad Crane Money Fund Average 7-Day Yield was unchanged at 0.02%, our Crane 100 Money Fund Index (the 100 largest taxable funds) also sits at 0.02%.

On a Gross Yield Basis (7-Day) (before expenses are taken out), the Crane MFA was down a basis point at 0.16% while the Crane 100 was down 2 basis points, also at 0.16%. Charged Expenses averaged 0.14% for both the Crane MFA and Crane 100. (We'll revise expenses on Monday once we upload the SEC's Form N-MFP data for 12/31.) The average WAM (weighted average maturity) for the Crane MFA and Crane 100 was 41 (unch.) and 46 days (up 2 days) respectively. (See our Crane Index or craneindexes.xlsx history file for more on our averages.)

Dec 28
 

With the coming of the New Year, Crane Data is ramping up preparations for its 2021 conference calendar. We'll be doing virtual events in January (Money Fund University on Jan. 21-22) and in March (Bond Fund Symposium, March 25-26). But we hope to return to live events by June. Crane's Money Fund Symposium, the largest gathering of money market fund managers and cash investors in the world, will take place June 23-25, 2021 at The Loews Philadelphia, in Philadelphia, Pa. The preliminary agenda is now available and registrations are now being taken. Money Fund Symposium attracts money fund managers, marketers and servicers, cash investors, money market securities dealers, issuers, and regulators. We review our preliminary agenda, as well as Crane Data's other 2021 conferences, below.

Our MF Symposium Agenda kicks off on Wednesday, June 23 with a keynote on "MMFs Adapting to Regulations, Tech & ESG" with Tom Callahan of BlackRock, Deborah Cunningham of Federated Investors and Peter Crane of Crane Data. The rest of the Day 1 Agenda includes: "Treasury Issuance & Repo Update," with Mark Cabana of BofA Securities, Dina Marchioni of Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Tom Katzenbach of the U.S. Treasury; a "Corporate Investor MF Discussion" with Tom Hunt of AFP; and, a "Major Money Fund Issues 2021" panel with moderator Ed Baldry of EPBComms, Tracy Hopkins of Dreyfus/BNY Mellon CIS, Rob Sabatino of UBS Asset Management, Jeff Weaver of Wells Fargo Asset Management. (The evening's reception is sponsored by Bank of America.)

Day 2 of Money Fund Symposium 2021 begins with "The State of the Money Fund Industry," which features Peter Crane, Michael Morin of Fidelity Investments and Peter Yi of Northern Trust Asset Management; followed by a "Senior Portfolio Manager Perspectives" panel, including Linda Klingman of Charles Schwab I.M. and Nafis Smith of Vanguard. Next up is "Government & Treasury Money Fund Issues," with Joseph Abate of Barclays as moderator, Adam Ackermann of J.P. Morgan Asset Management and Geoff Gibbs of DWS. The morning concludes with a "Muni & Tax Exempt Money Fund Update," featuring Colleen Meehan of Dreyfus, John Vetter of Fidelity and Sean Saroya of J.P. Morgan Securities.

The Afternoon of Day 2 (after a Dreyfus-sponsored lunch) features the segments: "Dealer's Choice: Supply, New Securities & CP" with moderator, Jeff Plotnik of U.S. Bancorp Asset Mgmt, Robe Crowe of Citi Global Markets, John Kodweis of J.P. Morgan and Stewart Cutler of Barclays; "Ratings Focus: Governance, Global & LGIPs" with Robert Callagy of Moody's Investors Service, Greg Fayvilevich of Fitch Ratings, and Michael Masih of S&P Global Ratings; "Ultra-Short, ETFs & Alt-Cash Update," with Alex Roever of JPM and Laurie Brignac of Invesco. The day's wrap-up presentation is "Brokerage Sweeps, Bank Deposits & Fin-Tech" involving Chris Melin of Ameriprise Financial and Kevin Bannerton of Total Bank Solutions. (The Day 2 reception is sponsored by Barclays.)

The third day of the Symposium features the sessions: "Strategists Speak '20: Fed & Rates, Repo & SOFR" with Priya Misra of TD Securities and Garret Sloan of Wells Fargo Securities; "European, ESG & ETF Issues," with Brenden Carroll of Dechert LLP and Jonathan Curry of HSBC Global A.M.; "FICC Repo & Agency Roundtable" with Kyle Lynch of FHLBanks Office of Finance. Peter Crane wraps up the conference with the session "Money Fund Statistics & Disclosures.

Visit the MF Symposium website at www.moneyfundsymposium.com) for more details. Registration is $750, and discounted hotel reservations are available. We hope you'll join us in Philadelphia this June! We'll of course be watching the coronavirus and vaccine rollout, and will adjust plans if travel bans are still in place come late spring. Note that some of our speakers have yet to confirm their participation, and the agenda is still in the process of being finalized, so watch for tweaks in coming weeks. E-mail us at info@cranedata.com to request the full brochure.)

We're also making final preparations for Crane's Money Fund University, which will be held online, January 21-22, 2021. Our Money Fund University (Online) will cover the history of money funds, interest rates, regulations (Rule 2a-7), ratings, rankings, money market instruments such as commercial paper, CDs and repo, and portfolio construction and credit analysis. We also include segments on offshore money funds and ultra-short bond funds.

Money Fund University's comprehensive program is good for both beginners and experienced professionals looking for a refresher. The latest agenda is available online and we are still accepting registrations ($250). (We're also willing to "comp" tickets for large Crane Data or sponsor clients, so let us know if you're interested.)

We're also getting ready for our next Crane's Bond Fund Symposium (Online), which will be held March 25-26. (Click here to see the agenda.) Bond Fund Symposium is the only conference devoted entirely to bond mutual funds, bringing together bond fund managers, marketers, and professionals with fixed-income issuers, investors and service providers. The majority of the content is aimed at the growing ultra-short and conservative ultra-short bond fund marketplace.

Crane Data, which recently celebrated the sixth anniversary of its Bond Fund Intelligence publication and BFI XLS bond fund information service and benchmarks, continues to expand its fixed income fund offerings with the recent launch of Bond Fund Wisdom product and Bond Fund Portfolio Holdings dataset. Bond Fund Symposium offers attendees a concentrated and affordable educational experience, as well as an excellent networking venue. Registration for Bond Fund Symposium is $250. Our mission is to deliver the best possible conference content at an affordable price to bond fund professionals and investors.

Finally, we've also set the dates and location for our next European Money Fund Symposium. It is scheduled for Oct. 21-22, 2021, in Paris, France. Let us know if you'd like more details on any of our events, and we hope to see you virtually in Q1, and live in Philadelphia and Paris later in 2021. Happy New Year!

Dec 21
 

As a reminder, we'll be hosting our annual "basic training" event, Crane's Money Fund University, on Jan. 21-22, 2021. This year's MFU will be online only (and $250 to attend), and will include two afternoons of live segments, as well as a number of pre-recorded sessions and access to recordings and binder materials. Money Fund University offers an affordable and comprehensive 2-day training on money market mutual funds. MFU covers the history of money funds, interest rates, regulations (Rule 2a-7), ratings, rankings, money market instruments such as commercial paper, CDs and repo, and portfolio construction and credit analysis. We also include segments on offshore money funds and ultra-short bond funds. New portfolio managers, analysts, investors, issuers, service providers, and anyone interested in expanding their knowledge of "cash" investing will benefit from our comprehensive program. Even experienced professionals should enjoy this refresher course and the opportunity to interact with peers in an informal setting. Attendee registration is $250 and sponsorship opportunities are $1K, $2K, $3K and $5K. (Note: Thanks to those who attended our recent Money Fund Wisdom Demo & Training. If you missed it, you can catch the replay here.) Mark your calendars too for our upcoming Bond Fund Symposium, which will also be Online only and $250, March 25-26, 2021. Finally, given the arrival of a coronavirus vaccine, we also hope and plan to return to live in-person events by this summer! Our big show, Money Fund Symposium, is scheduled for June 23-25, 2021 in Philadelphia, and our European Money Fund Symposium is scheduled for October 21-22, 2021 in Paris, France. Please let us know if you'd like to see the PDF agendas for these events, or if you'd like to find out more information on sponsorships or "comp" attendance tickets. Thanks for your support and patience in 2020, Happy Holidays, and we hope to see you at one of our virtual or live events in 2021!